How To Look and Act Like a Professional Barista

Have you ever dreamed of a ‘going places’ career in the coffee industry as a Barista?

I have to admit, when I saw the headlines to this article the above is what flashed into my head. Then reading it through, I discovered many great points. From dress, attitude, customer management and producing a great product. I did learn some great bits I will take and use in my current day job. Read the full article here… it’s worth a look.

If you are going to be working as a professional barista (or as a professional anything), here are some words of advice that you should heed above all else: “What is crucial to your success is your ability to get along with your customers, your co-workers, and your managers. Having outstanding technical skills will not bring outstanding success. Having outstanding interpersonal skills is even more important.”

Most interpersonal skills are merely common sense, but many of us haven’t spent much time thinking about them at a concious level. You should focus on your interpersonal personal skills and work daily to improve them, just as you focus on your barista techniques and think about how to improve those. And there are a few interpersonal skills that are not automatic, and do not come naturally, but they can be cultivated.

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Blend beans for the perfect Espresso

From my youngest days, I remember going to a roasting spot with my folks. We would have to make a special trip to a little building just on the other side of town. It was on a main road, yet you could easily miss the whole building. It was small brown wood sided building. Up the few steps and through the front door, you were greeted with an aroma that was smooth yet bold. The first thing you saw inside was a counter that went from the front of the store to the back. Under the counter was many small square glass faced cube containers of beans. Every bean was brown, but not all the same shade of brown.

What made this the place for the insiders to visit was that you weren’t buying coffee of a particular type, grower, or from a place in the world. They mixed beans from multiple locations to come up with unique flavors. Every time my parents went in, the Roaster would come out with a new brew he had come up with.

These experiences gave me a different view on what made a great espresso. The actual cost of buying small quantities of beans and mixing is relatively small so it’s a bit of fun anyone can enjoy. Till I get time to post up my logs, visit this article on Coffee Blending to get started – we’ll catch up later on your successes mixes.

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